Running the gauntlet every day.

Photo by dionhinchcliffe via flickr

I walked to Whole Foods from my office near Thomas Circle as I often do. On the way back, my coworker and I encountered a man I see quite often on 14th in that general area. He is a older man, short cropped hair, short beard, yellowish eyes. He was wearing a blue long sleeved t shirt and blue pants. Both were soiled. He is obviously an addict and has mental health issues, but unfortunately is also sometimes aggressive.

As my friend and I walked by he started muttering something about if we “had a boyfriend…” and “he probably did not know what to do to (us) but (he) did…” and then just started mumbling about “p***y” over and over again while following us.

I am ashamed to admit it, but I have given up saying anything. That corridor of 14th St. and McPherson Square park are so chock full of homeless men with mental health and addiction issues, it has become commonplace to be harassed both to and from work, and sometimes during lunch. I would estimate that I am harassed at least 3-4 times a week going from McPherson square metro to my office. It doesn’t help that the ground is often covered in those disgusting photoshopped cards featuring womens’ rear ends as promos for various clubs and DJs.

I feel like I am running the gauntlet every day. And I feel like screaming at a mentally ill/drunk/stoned man is going to get me nowhere. But it scares me, and I have to get to work.

Submitted by Jessica

Location: 14th between P and Thomas Circle

Time of harassment: Day Time (9:30A-3:30P)

Do you have a personal experience with gender-based public sexual harassment or assault you would like to submit? Just click here and fill out the online submission form. All submissions are posted anonymously unless you specify.

One response to “Running the gauntlet every day.

  1. I understand how you feel. It’s so difficult but don’t give up. If it helps, you should know that I started picking up those trashy fliers and throwin them away. Then, my fiancĂ© started picking them up as he was walking to and from work. His male colleague saw him crumple it up and toss it and started to do the same. Once a man across the street saw him do it an he said, “hey! Is that one of those fliers? I hate those things. I’m going to throw them away too.” I certainly isn’t a revolution but a little step can go a long way and every step forward is a victory!

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